Hope In The Shadows: A Call For Transformation

Aleema Shivji Economics, Inequality, Tax

Extreme levels of inequality cast shadows over the lives of billions of the world’s poorest people. We must see the faces behind the statistics, says Oxfam GB’s Chief Impact Officer Aleema Shivji, and sound the alarm for change: to empower workers, break up monopolies and tax the ultra-rich. These are not mere “policy recommendations” – they are pathways to change for the lives of countless individuals.

We are closer to seeing the world’s first trillionaire than ending poverty: that’s why we need fair taxes now

Chiara Putaturo In the news, Inequality, Tax

Oxfam’s new Davos report highlights how our economic system funnels billions to billionaires while ordinary workers lose. A big part of the solution has to be new wealth and windfall taxes, including a European wealth tax, says Chiara Putaturo.

Face à l’écart de richesse scandaleux de 100 000 milliards de dollars entre les femmes et les hommes, verra-t-on enfin à Davos la promotion d’une économie qui fonctionne réellement pour les femmes ?

Lurit Yugusuk Gender, In the news, Inequality

Avec des milliards de femmes encore sous-payées, exploitées et portant le poids de l’injustice qui prévaut dans les politiques fiscales, de soin et climatiques, nous voulons savoir comment l’élite de Davos contribuera à la construction d’une économie féministe pour demain, déclarent Lurit Yugusuk et Imali Ngusale du réseau du développement et de communication des femmes africaines, FEMNET (read blog in English at the link below)

The $100-trillion gender wealth gap is an outrage: can Davos get behind a global economy that actually works for women?

Lurit Yugusuk Gender, In the news, Inequality

With billions of women still underpaid, exploited and bearing the brunt of unjust tax, care and climate policies, we need to hear how the Davos elite will play its part in building a feminist economic future, say Lurit Yugusuk and Imali Ngusale of the African Women’s Development and Communication Network, FEMNET.

After half a century of misguided policies, here’s how the World Bank and IMF can work for the poor…

Anthony Kamande Debt, Economics, Events

It’s time both the World Bank and IMF abandoned the short-term fixes and austerity that have repeatedly failed people in developing countries, says Anthony Kamande. With their joint annual meetings back on African soil for the first time in five decades, he sets out six ways both institutions can make real and lasting change: from debt restructuring to encouraging social spending and taxes on the wealthiest.

We need to talk about inequality in West Africa

Mohamadou Fadel Diop Economics, Events, Inequality

As the African Union and regional economic communities gather to discuss their economies, the gulf between the rich and the rest in West Africa needs to be top of the agenda, says Mohamadou Fadel Diop – and that conversation must give serious attention to inequality-busting policies such as reversing austerity and debt cancellation.

Think informal women workers don’t pay tax? Actually they pay more tax than Elon Musk…

Alex Bush Gender, Tax, Women's Economic Empowerment

The reality is that hundreds of millions of informal and unpaid women workers are paying way more than their fair share – while the super-rich avoid taxes with impunity. Alex Bush, Clare Coffey and Saleha Shah debunk some myths about tax and women’s informal work.

The super-rich pay lower taxes than you – and here’s how they do it…

Chiara Putaturo Inequality, Research, Tax

How do the wealthy get away with paying a lower percentage of their income and wealth in taxes than ordinary people? A big part of the answer is that many of their fortune streams, from dividends to inheritance, are chronically undertaxed, says Chiara Putaturo in our latest blog for Davos 2023

Whether in Asia, Africa or North America, it’s been a profitable polycrisis for billionaires

Anthony Kamande Inequality, Research, Tax

Around the world it seems the pandemic and surging food and fuel prices have actually boosted the wealth of the super-rich, even as they pushed hundreds of millions of ordinary people into misery and penury, says Anthony Kamande in our second blog for Davos 2023