Let’s put a new deal for care at the heart of Lebanon’s recovery plan

Marwan Issa Fragile contexts, Gender, Women's Economic Empowerment

Women are paying the price as the nation’s deep, economic crisis drives a surge in care work, says Marwan Issa

Across Britain, paid and unpaid care work remains undervalued and ignored: here are six ways governments can change that

Silvia Galandini Poverty in the UK, Research, Women's Economic Empowerment

Being a parent, unpaid carer or paid care worker in Wales, Scotland or England too often means being forced into hardship. Silvia Galandini and Claire Spoors introduce Oxfam’s new paper, which sets out how to break the link between care and poverty.

Spare us the token gestures: International Women’s Day must be a call to action for economic justice

Dana Abed Economics, Influencing, Women's Economic Empowerment

Globally, men own $105 trillion more wealth than women. So today of all days we need to talk about how our global economic system just isn’t working for women, says Dana Abed, as Oxfam launches its #HerMoneyMatters campaign.

As Asia changes and ages, domestic workers are in demand – but who will stand up for their rights?

Saleha Shah Living wage, Research, Women's Economic Empowerment

Paid carers are more important than ever to Asian societies and economies. Yet, say Saleha Shah and Raina Bhattacharya, upcoming Oxfam research will highlight how these millions of workers remain underpaid, exploited and invisible. Building decent care systems will mean paying and treating these workers fairly, and also creating new public care infrastructure that can meet everyone’s needs.

Bernie Sanders on billionaires, inequality and the fight against ‘global oligarchy’

Bernie Sanders In the news, Inequality, Research

We’re delighted that Senator Bernie Sanders has written a foreword to this year’s Davos report. Here are his powerful thoughts on our bleak economic reality – but also reasons to be hopeful as more and more people join the fight for economic justice.

Supermarkets are assessing human rights abuses in their supply chains – here’s what they need to do better

Eline Achterberg Agriculture, Private sector, Rights

Eline Achterberg introduces a new Oxfam briefing that supports supermarkets to improve their “human rights impact assessments” in food supply chains – and, crucially, to take action to make real change to workers’ lives.

Kenya’s affluent classes panic when domestic staff are away… so why can’t they acknowledge workers’ value with a decent wage?

Blandina Bobson Gender, Living wage, Women's Economic Empowerment

During big holidays such as Christmas, social media buzzes with people struggling to cope without domestic workers. Clearly, the workers make a huge hidden contribution to households and the economy. Yet illegal exploitation of these vital women workers continues – and it’s urgent our government steps in to stop it, says Blandina Bobson.

An ‘Uber’ app for cooks and cleaners? How tech is starting to change the lives of informal domestic workers

Fatema Tuz Johoora Innovation, Private sector, Women's Economic Empowerment

On International Domestic Workers’ day, Fatema Tuz Johoora and Tarek Aziz explain how gig economy apps can make Bangladesh’s invisible army of domestic workers visible, as well as offering new opportunities to help them claim their rights to better pay and conditions.

How can we persuade firms to improve employees’ lives? Here’s what I’ve learned during a decade in workers’ rights…

Rachel Wilshaw Living wage, Private sector, Rights

Oxfam’s workers’ rights expert Rachel Wilshaw shares six insights from her experiences of working with companies to drive progress on decent wages and conditions.

Governments know shockingly little about the millions of informal and unpaid women workers – and, in a world that undervalues their labour, that’s no accident

Alex Bush Gender, Research, Women's Economic Empowerment

Millions of unpaid care and informal workers too often live in poverty, face long hours with harsh conditions, and see their efforts dismissed as “not real work”. On International Workers’ Day, Alex Bush calls for those in power to find out much more about these women as a crucial first step to valuing their work.